ARC Review: Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart | “Haunting, sophisticated.”

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synopsis

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was.
~ Overview stolen from Barnes & Noble because I tried and failed at writing a synopsis that wouldn’t give the entire book away….~

 

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This book was extraordinary. I finished it in one day (on a school day too!). And let me tell you, I usually take a while to finish books, but I flew through this one. It was quite similar to We Were Liars, but (I didn’t even think this was possible) 100 times more twisted. The story jumps back and forth in time, and throughout the book, you slowly unravel why the main character (Imogen) is on the run, in the first chapter. There are a series of clues throughout the book, that keeps you eager to finish it, because it is almost unthinkable as to who is responsible for the crime going on.

I can’t explain to you guys how fantastic the horribly twisted plot of this book was, without giving away spoilers. My only complaint is that the characters aren’t likable. They aren’t really meant to be likable either, because the story wouldn’t work if they were, but still. That’s why this book could never be my favorite, but this is an absolute must-read. At the end of the book, your just sitting there, all jaw-dropped, like, “WOW.”

Favorite ARC you’ve read this year?

lovesarah

 

We Are Okay//Nina Lacour: not your typical YA novel

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Publisher: Dutton Books

Publication date: February 14, 2017

Pages: 240

“So lonely and beautiful that I could hardly breathe. This is a perfect book.” —Stephanie Perkins, bestselling author of Anna and the French Kiss

 

synopsis

“You go through life thinking there’s so much you need…

Until you leave with only your phone, your wallet, and a picture of your mother.

Marin hasn’t spoken to anyone from her old life since the day she left everything behind. No one knows the truth about those final weeks. Not even her best friend Mabel. But even thousands of miles away from the California coast, at college in New York, Marin still feels the pull of the life and tragedy she’s tried to outrun. Now, months later, alone in an emptied dorm for winter break, Marin waits. Mabel is coming to visit and Marin will be forced to face everything that’s been left unsaid and finally confront the loneliness that has made a home in her heart.”  ~Nina LaCour, We Are Okay

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I feel like this book deserves more than four stars, but there’s one thing that just makes it not quite there: the characters. I felt very passionate for Mabel and Marin (our main characters), throughout the entire book, but I didn’t fall in love with their personalities. Don’t get me wrong, they weren’t necessarily bad people, and I don’t really know how to put a finger on it: there was just nothing that extraordinary that made them stick out.

“I thought that it was more likely the opposite. I must have shut grief out. Found it in books. Cried over fiction instead of the truth. The truth was unconfined, unadorned. There was no poetic language to it, no yellow butterflies, no epic floods. There wasn’t a town trapped underwater or generations of men with the same name destined to make the same mistakes. The truth was vast enough to drown in.”

Now that the negative thoughts are spoken of…there is SO MUCH I loved about this book! First off, the writing was unique, gorgeous, and perfected artwork. Nothing like most YA books I’ve read; I just finished The Book Thief, and personally, I thought the writing in We Are Okay was just as exceptional. The story jumps through time, and at the end of the book, all the mysteries are cleverly explained…which means there’s a huge plot twist (this is my favorite thing in books). Also, the writing was somewhat poetic; if you enjoyed We Were Liars, you will love this!!

It’s a dark place, not knowing.
It’s difficult to surrender to.
But I guess it’s where we live most of the time. I guess it’s where we all live, so maybe it doesn’t have to be so lonely. Maybe I can settle into it, cozy up to it, make a home inside uncertainty.

What’s your favorite type of book?

We Were Liars//e. lockhart

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Publisher: Delacorte Press

Publication date: May 14th, 2014

Pages: 242

Hello! I actually read this book a LONG time ago, but I re-read it all the time. When I wrote the review for this book a year ago, I hadn’t fully comprehended it. Here you have my slightly wittier and more polished version: Oh and the Deluxe Edition is being released this May!!

 

synopsis

“We are Sinclairs.

No one is needy.

No one is wrong.

We live, at least in the summertime, on a private island off the coast of Massachusetts.

Perhaps that is all you need to know.

Except that some of us are liars.”

~e. lockhart, We Were Liars

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This may sound strange, but despite that this is my absolute favorite book, I’ll won’t deny that it has it’s flaws of course. It’s not specifically the deaths that are chosen which bother me (I don’t really complain about those) but rather a character’s change of personality every so often.

The universe is seeming really huge right now. I need something to hold on to.

If Gat weren’t in the story, I honestly don’t think this would be my favorite book. He literally holds the best character I’ve ever found in any novel. Cady doesn’t even deserve him, but you do have to acknowledge what she’s suffering from throughout most of the book, and not think “Cady’s an idiot. Why would anyone burn down their grandpa’s house?” You’ll recognize E. Lockhart’s  writing style as simplistic although soon you’ll have to give it some thought; it’s not the type of book you can necessarily mentally whiz through.

If you want to live where people are not afraid of mice, you must give up living in palaces.

Cadence is often viewed as selfish, which leads to many poor ratings, and I know she is. But it’s bigger than that; you could look at the summary of the book and easily say it’s awful, but you have to comprehend the writing to enjoy it. Depending on how you look at it, this novel tends to have a love/hate reaction.

Do not accept an evil you can change.

Loved or hated it?

lovesarah